Search
  • Angus Scott

Queen Elizabeth's shortbread biscuits

Updated: Nov 7

Shortbread biscuits were a specialty in England for royalty throughout history, mainly because they were expensive to make. Later on regular people could afford them and it was common to break a shortbread biscuit over the head of a newly married bride, and consuming them with a "First footer" on New Years is still done today in Scotland - often dunking them in whiskey. Elizabeth II granted a Royal Warrant recently (The right to use the the notice that the Royal family uses them, and also to supply the household with product). She was Queen of the United Kingdom from 6 February 1952 until her death on 8 September 2022. Her reign of 70 years and 214 days was the longest of any British monarch and the second-longest recorded of any monarch of a sovereign country. She enjoyed them all of her long life - often as a snack before breakfast! Shortbread is a "Thing" in the U.K. It's very common for travelers to seek out local shortbread offerings to bring home to their friends, in fact it's expected. We at Scottish Fix adapted a Scottish family recipe by having ex-patriots from the U.K.'s Saint George Society taste test all of our recipe's and select the best one. It took years to perfect the biscuits you get today and it was well worth the effort. You can't find a better shortbread cookie anywhere in the world! Here's a salute to the Queen's memory and our thanks for being a gracious and lovely person all her long life.




11 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All